This is actually what America would look like without gerrymandering!

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/01/13/this-is-actually-what-america-would-look-like-without-gerrymandering/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.79547a0b6808

In this article by The Washington Post it explains how gerrymandering can be optimized in the US. It includes an interesting topic of how to fix the biased assortment in the district assortments. Instead of allowing people to draw the lines we can instead program a computer to draw the lines out for us. The computer program is able to compact the population much more orderly than any other decision made by man. It is so accurate that it is able to reflect actual neighborhoods and homes in that neighborhood to be perfectly divided. The most interesting part is that this article also includes pictures to compare how we divide the US in our current congressional district map to the computer drawn map. It is easily seen that the computer drawn map seems much more optimal both in order and compactness. So what do you guys think, would this computer drawn map be a better option than the current mess that is the US’s district map?

 

2 Replies to “This is actually what America would look like without gerrymandering!”

  1. Hey, Cam. Interesting post and idea.

    I think what Professor Plante talked about a week or two ago based on what I brought up is salient here: Computers can be hacked (https://www.cbsnews.com/amp/news/why-voting-machines-in-the-u-s-are-easy-targets-for-hackers/ for example) and so I’m leery of placing unambiguous trust in machines handling the polls.

    On top of that, while machines can be “objective” the people designing them never are. So I suspect we could still see a lot of gaming the system from politicians.

  2. I have to say that I agree with both sides – this kind of computer research is important, yet is also something we should be weary of for hacking-sake. Instead, I see it as a great way to look at voting in a more mathematical way. This article, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/30/learning/lesson-plans/investigating-gerrymandering-and-the-math-behind-partisan-maps.html , shows how students in school are able to look at voting in such a manner and can use this kind of research to solve the problems of gerrymandering in the future. Being able to look at these kinds of maps and figuring out how to use this kind of math to dedraw such district lines will hopefully be a big help in the future of politics to make the voting system that much more equal and fair.

Leave a Reply